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April 18, 2013

C.S Lewis Fans

cs-lewisHere are some CS Lewis books on sale for a limited time. Click on the title to avail of the promo

1. The Abolition of Man (Annonated) – These essays represent C.S. Lewis’ defense of objective truth and natural law. Both Lewis’ own footnotes and the Editor’s Annotations are all active (i.e. internally-linked) for hassle-free navigation.

2. A Mind Awake: An Anthology of C. S. Lewis – C.S. Lewis believed in the absolute logic of faith; his books, letters, and essays demonstrated the immutability of religion in his life. This collection mines their pages to bring out some of his essential lessons and to showcase the themes that provided the foundation for his philosophy: The Nature of Man, The Moral World, Sin, The Christian Commitment, Love and Sex, Hell and Heaven, and others. His preoccupations produced inspiring literature that was sometimes whimsical, often provocative, and always emotionally compelling. Here, then, is an anthology to return to again and again—whenever we most need wisdom, insight into how best to wrestle with a particular challenge, or simply the kind of unexpected perspective Lewis always provides.

3. Reflections on the Psalms (Harvest Book)

The Psalms were written as songs; we should read them as poetry, in the spirit of lyric, not as sermons or instructions. But they are also shrouded in mystery, and in this careful reading from one of our most trusted fellow travelers, C.S. Lewis helps us begin to reveal their meaning in our daily lives and in the world. Reflecting again and anew on these beloved passages, we can find both joy and difficulty, but also, always, real enlightenment and moments of transcendent grace.

4. The Four Loves (Harvest Book)

We hear often that love is patient and kind, not envious or prideful. We hear that human love is a reflection of divine love. We hear that God is love. But how do we understand its work in our lives, its perils and rewards? Here, the incomparable C. S. Lewis examines human love in four forms: affection, the most basic, general, and emotive; friendship, the most rare, least jealous, and, in being freely chosen, perhaps the most profound; Eros, passionate love that can run counter to happiness and poses real danger; charity, the greatest, most spiritual, and least selfish. Proper love is a risk, but to bar oneself from it–to deny love–is a damning choice. Love is a need and a gift; love brings joy and laughter. We must seek to be awakened and so to find an Appreciative love through which “all things are possible.”

5. Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life

This book is not an autobiography. It is not a confession. It is, however, certainly one of the most beautiful and insightful accounts of a person coming to faith. Here, C.S. Lewis takes us from his childhood in Belfast through the loss of his mother, to boarding school and a youthful atheism in England, to the trenches of World War I, and then to Oxford, where he studied, read, and, ultimately, reasoned his way back to God. It is perhaps this aspect of Surprised by Joy that we—believers and nonbelievers—find most compelling and meaningful; Lewis was searching for joy, for an elusive and momentary sensation of glorious yearning, but he found it, and spiritual life, through the use of reason.

In this highly personal, thoughtful, intelligent memoir, Lewis guides us toward joy and toward the surprise that awaits anyone who seeks a life beyond the expected.

6. Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold

Haunted by the myth of Cupid and Psyche throughout his life, C.S. Lewis wrote this, his last, extraordinary novel, to retell their story through the gaze of Psyche’s sister, Orual. Disfigured and embittered, Orual loves her younger sister to a fault and suffers deeply when she is sent away to Cupid, the God of the Mountain. Psyche is forbidden to look upon the god’s face, but is persuaded by her sister to do so; she is banished for her betrayal. Orual is left alone to grow in power but never in love, to wonder at the silence of the gods. Only at the end of her life, in visions of her lost beloved sister, will she hear an answer.

7. Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer

What are we doing when we pray? What is at the heart of this most intimate conversation, the dialogue between a person and God? How does prayer—its form, its regularity, its content, its insistence—shape who we are and how we believe? In this collection of letters from C. S. Lewis to a close friend, Malcolm, we see an intimate side of Lewis as he considers all aspects of prayer and how this singular ritual impacts the lives and souls of the faithful. With depth, wit, and intelligence, as well as his sincere sense of a continued spiritual journey, Lewis brings us closer to understanding the role of prayer in our lives and the ways in which we might better imagine our relationship with God.

8. The Business of Heaven: Daily Readings from C. S. Lewis

9. All My Road Before Me: The Diary of C. S. Lewis, 1922-1927

The life of the young Lewis was filled with contemplations quite different from those of the mature author. This early diary gives readers a window on the world of his formative years. Edited and with an Introduction by Walter Hooper; Index; photographs.

10. Present Concerns

Nineteen essays on democratic values, threats to educational and spiritual fulfillment, literary censorship, and other topics all displaying Lewis’s characteristic sanity and persuasiveness. Introduction by Walter Hooper.

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